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Re: [BKARTS] Warped books- Wavy pages



Eric,

I would suggest that you place sheets of Reemay, cut an inch or so larger than the book and that you put a sheet of it between each of the damp leaves, as well as between the cover and the flyleaf. You don't want to use so many layers that it strains the spine too much, so do it in small sections. Place waxed paper between the last page you've done to prevent moisture penetration into the next section. Place the book under weights for a few days until pages feel smooth and dry. Then, leaving the waxed paper in place, put the reemay between the next section of damp pages, remembering to use waxed paper between the damp and dry sections.

Reemay is a nonwoven material that wicks moisture. It is available from Talas
and other bookbinding stores. You will also find it, or a similar product, at your local fabric store. (I have forgotten the name of another substance which also wicks moisture. Maybe another reader can help.


Betty Storz







----- Original Message ----- From: "Eric Sigurdson" <esigurdson@xxxxxxx>
To: <BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Friday, October 26, 2007 7:29 AM
Subject: [BKARTS] Warped books- Wavy pages



Hello Everyone!



I'm Eric. I'm afraid I have no formal experience or education in
their care or fabrication, but I certainly do love books! Everyone who knows
me has probably seen the look of extreme discomfort whenever I see a
precious paper repository of art, knowledge, or lore mishandled. I've
recently left my lifelong home of Colorado for undergraduate study in
mathematics at University in Japan, which brings me to the reason I am here.
I sent the largest and most expensive textbooks that I wanted to have with
me ahead via international airmail, as I could pack them more carefully and
am familiar with the way luggage is treated by airline employees. When they
arrived here at my dorm in Japan I immediately opened the box (my big
mistake, judging from the one relevant article that I found in the archive),
very anxious to see how they had weathered the trip. I don't know for sure,
but I don't believe that I noticed any warping that night. But the day
after, to my great dismay, I noticed that the pages on most of my books, as
seen from the top and bottom, had noticeably warped. It seems that
condensation formed on the books because I brought them cold into the much
more humid environment of Japan. I'm sending this post to ask for any
advice. Since the books arrived about 15 days ago, I have been pressing them
with other books in an attempt to smooth out the creases with weight. This
seems to be working to some degree, but I wanted to post here and ask if
there is anything else that I might do to. Time is no issue, if I simply
need to keep pressing the books for weeks, or months if need be, then I will
patiently do so. Any help is greatly appreciated, many thanks in advance. I
apologize if I have committed some faux pas in the formatting, content, or
routing of this message. Please bear with me while I learn the particulars.




Eric


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***********************************************
Visit "The Book of Origins: A survey of American Fine Binding"
Online exhibit and catalog order form at
<http://library.syr.edu/digital/exhibits/b/bookoforigins/>
For all your subscription questions, go to the
Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
See <http://www.philobiblon.com> for full information
***********************************************



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