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[BKARTS] AW: [BKARTS] AW: [BKARTS] Small manuscript book...



Martin,

sorry, the book doesn't give any information on spellings. I think it's
equally unusual to write the "y" in "Litaneyen" with tose '', too. I'm not
sure if I got you right regarding the diacritic writing in 'und/auch/zu/auf'
-- it actually has no diacritic meaning nor is it influencing prononciation.
It's just that the lower-case 'u' is topped by a dash to distinguish it from
a lower-case 'n'. You can see that still today in many handwritings (I do
that, too).

With regard to the word "Rochen", I was thinking of a quite regional
expression, too which would go in the same direction as your guess about
Swiss German. I checked nearly all historical dictionnairies given bei Uni
Trier (http://germazope.uni-trier.de/Projects/WBB/woerterbuecher/) and found
one meaning that would at least make a tiny bit of sense: 'rochen' is a
spelling for 'ruochen' from old german with a meaning going towards
"directing one's thoughts towards s.th.; be considered, considerate; to care
about, to wish, to desire". But then it should be a verb and thus be written
in lower case. 

Another guess is that it refers to the french word "la roche" (crag, rock)
because the writing "in der Rochen" is an obsolete diction for what would be
today "in der Roche" thus implying the noun is female.

I was already wondering if the text consists of a part that has been
extincted and shown up again, overwritten by a younger text, so that what
you see on the picture is probably two texts without relation between them?
I wonder because some parts are so clear to see, other parts seem about to
vanish ...

Regards,
Astri



 

 

-----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
Von: Book_Arts-L [mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx] Im Auftrag von Martin
Wheeler
Gesendet: Mittwoch, 21. November 2007 00:33
An: BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Betreff: Re: [BKARTS] AW: [BKARTS] Small manuscript book...

On Tue, 20 Nov 2007, tulibri wrote:

> I don't think that the word in the ninth row reads "Kochen" because this
is
> a very old handwriting: According to a book I have that shows german
> scripts, I assume it is from about 18th century (or older) which means
that
> what to us today reads like a "K" actually is a "R".

I would agree with you -- and like you, the meaning escapes me entirely.

Many thanks for helping me out with 'Kraefftiger' -- and 'Patro nen',
also, both of which which eluded me completely.
'Litaneyen' I should have guessed -- I'd got most of the pieces of it.

Does your book on Old German handwriting give any explanation for the
differentiation between the "umlauted" (diacritic) u in 'und/auch/zu/auf';
as opposed to that used in 'Creuz'?  I'm very interested in that.  (Makes
it sound almost Swiss!)

Regards,
-- 
Martin Wheeler   -   00 44 1458 83-1103    Glastonbury - BA6 9PH - England
mwheeler@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx   http://avalonit.net/   http://martinwheeler.net/
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