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Re: [BKARTS] BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 30 Dec 2007 to 31 Dec 2007 (#2008-1)



Sounds like a very interesting topic Charles,
I would like to hear more about these books
Sue

--
http://www.cafiberartists.com/ 
http://postcardstoamerica.org/

-------------- Original message -------------- 
From: BOOK_ARTS-L automatic digest system <LISTSERV@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> 

> There are 2 messages totalling 183 lines in this issue. 
> 
> Topics of the day: 
> 
> 1. vellum 
> 2. craft standards, poor books 
> 
> *********************************************** 
> The Bonefolder, Vol. 4, No. 1, 2007 is Now Online at 
> 
> 
> For all your subscription questions, go to the 
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> ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 
> 
> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2007 18:23:14 +1100 
> From: J Mauch 
> Subject: Re: vellum 
> 
> Jack 
> Thank you for your instructions. I followed vellum 101 using kid, and it is 
> drying at the moment. I scraped any residual fat using my paring knife, and 
> then rubbed with pumice, Somewhat mottled with cream and brown colours it 
> has a medieval look which I like. 
> Soon I will have a large sheepskin - I had to abandon the lamb as I was too 
> busy - and take note of your instructions re fat removal. What sort of 
> clamps do you use. If you were able to send me a photo I would be most 
> grateful. 
> Am curious about your comment re translucency. I thought that book vellum is 
> translucent? 
> 
> Thanks for your help 
> Helen 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Jack C. Thompson" 
> To: 
> Sent: Friday, December 28, 2007 10:49 PM 
> Subject: Re: [BKARTS] vellum 
> 
> 
> > Joe, 
> > 
> > I've been making vellum for more than 30 years, from deer, calf, goat, 
> > and sheep. 
> > 
> > If you've been able to de-hair (de-wool) these skins after two days in 
> > a lime bath you've done very well. 
> > 
> > Have they been fleshed? 
> > 
> > The skins are not stretched 'over' a frame; they are tied to a frame 
> > and 'stretch' as they dry. 
> > 
> > I use clamps to hold the skin and cotton closeline cord going from the 
> > clamps to pins stuck into holes drilled into the frame; the cord is 
> > connected to the pins with a pipe hitch, which allows the tension from 
> > each clamp to be tightened. 
> > 
> > Alternatives include pushing a marble (or somesuch) into an edge of 
> > the skin and closing it with a half-hitch which is then tied to a pin 
> > in the frame. 
> > 
> > The easiest way is to make holes along the edges of the skin (about 1" 
> > in from the edge) and run the clothesline through the holes and around 
> > the frame. 
> > 
> > The skin should be stretched as tight as possible in a wet condition; 
> > it will dry drumtight. 
> > 
> > This is vellum 101. 
> > 
> > Vellum 202 involves a circular knife to clear the hairside and fleshside 
> > of any extraneous material. 
> > 
> > Vellum 303 involves using that same knife to reduce the thickness of the 
> > skin before cutting it out of the drying frame. 
> > 
> > The first knife I used for making vellum was made from a plywood blade 
> > from a circular saw. I ground off all the teeth and then ground half 
> > of the blade to a knife-edge on one side. 
> > 
> > Then I took a couple of pieces of 1.5" dowel and screwed them together 
> > through the hole in the center of the blade. This was used to scrape 
> > the hides clean on both sides, using considerable pressure on the 
> > down strokes. 
> > 
> > As the hide loosens during this scraping you need to be able to tighten 
> > the cord around the skin. 
> > 
> > If you've tightened the hide well enough it should sound something like 
> > a bass drum when you thump it. If you haven't tightened it enough the 
> > skin will be translucent and you can use it as a window. For 
> > illumination, 
> > not for seeing through. 
> > 
> > The lime bath is fine for goatskin, but not enough for sheep. Sheepskins 
> > have extra oil (lanolin) which needs to be removed, and pouring the odd 
> > pan of hot water over the stretched skin, while scraping, will help. 
> > 
> > If the sheepskin still looks oily after it dries brush on some lime paste. 
> > 
> > After a couple of days scrape it off and decide if you need to do it 
> > again. 
> > 
> > Jack 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> >>Hello 
> >>I have 3 skins of goat and sheep which I soaked in a lime bath for a 
> >>couple of days following slaughter. I would like to make vellum from them. 
> >>The hair has been removed and now I think I have to dry them by stretching 
> >>over a frame - has anybody had any experience of the vellum making 
> >>process? Thanks Joe 
> > 
> > Thompson Conservation Lab. 
> > 7549 N. Fenwick 
> > Portland, Oregon 97217 
> > USA 
> > 
> > 503/735-3942 
> > 
> > http://www.teleport.com/~tcl 
> > 
> > "The lyfe so short; the craft so long to lerne." 
> > Chaucer _Parlement of Foules_ 1386 
> > 
> > *********************************************** 
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> > 
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> > 
> > 
> > -- 
> > No virus found in this incoming message. 
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> > Version: 7.5.516 / Virus Database: 269.17.11/1201 - Release Date: 
> > 28/12/2007 11:51 AM 
> > 
> > 
> 
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> For all your subscription questions, go to the 
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> 
> ------------------------------ 
> 
> Date: Mon, 31 Dec 2007 20:00:07 -0800 
> From: Charles Brownson 
> Subject: craft standards, poor books 
> 
> I am trying to master a style of artists book I might call 'rustic' -- to step 
> outside the fine printing tradition of craft perfection. Think of the Zen tea 
> masters' preference for a bowl a little misshapen, with a glaze which has 
> dripped or crackled in firing. So the question is how to tell such a thing from 
> a book which is just badly made. I understand this is a question freighted with 
> Zen, equivalent to the master's uncanny ability to assess the supplicant's 
> degree of enlightenment, knowing when you've captured the qi of a thing -- if 
> you know it, then you know how, and until you know it you can't find out how. 
> I'm reasonably conversant with the literature of aesthetics -- or I thought I 
> was... The issue seems to be related also to this unease with the limited reach 
> of the medium of artists books, that well-made equals decorous and that the 
> expressive range and power of the best painting and literature has not been 
> captured and won't be until we open 
> ourselves to a much rougher, brawling, bigger style. 
> 
> So -- does anyone know who has written about this? I mean when is a thing 
> 'rough-hewn' and not just bad workmanship. The solitary source I can cite is 
> David Pye, The Nature and Art of Workmanship (Cambridge University Press, 1968) 
> in which he distinguishes the workmanship of risk from the workmanship of 
> certainty. And some very remote material such as de Kooning's struggle to paint 
> Woman 1 and how we've never felt quite comfortable with it. 
> 
> Charles 
> ocotilloarts.com 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
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> The Bonefolder, Vol. 4, No. 1, 2007 is Now Online at 
> 
> 
> For all your subscription questions, go to the 
> Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive. 
> See for full information 
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> 
> ------------------------------ 
> 
> End of BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 30 Dec 2007 to 31 Dec 2007 (#2008-1) 
> **************************************************************** 

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