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Re: [BKARTS] creating embossed bookcloth



Beth,
Like Bill said, 19th Century fabric was embossed with male and female dies. Sometimes on a drum embossing machine. the rest of the decorative work was/is done after the case is constructed, before combining with the text block. I have a few plates that I have designed and used for historical work. The best fabrics are the thin starch-filled book fabric but I have used cloths like Arrestox as well, and with enough pressure and a bit of moisture this can work as well. The trouble with trying to match 19th Century embossed fabric designs is that there were so many. I try for approximation, and sometimes am able to for restoration an antique cloth from an old rebound book.


The blind and gilt work was done with brass dies, and placed on the boards and thus impressed. I have a variety of these that I use, both magnesium and copper, for cost effectiveness. They're based on original designs so I know when the dies were used, giving me more accuracy in producing a historical binding. I warm them and place them and nip the cover in a nipping press for a minute or more. For corners I use 4 individual dies so that I can use them on a variety of book sizes. I generally emboss soon after the cloth is pasted to the boards so there is a bit of moisture in the cloth and this helps make a bright impression.

Vernon Wiering



On Jan 17, 2008, at 1:50 PM, Elizabeth Stegenga wrote:

Has anyone successfully created an embossed bookcloth that mimics Victorian
cloth? I have a few books to reback that originally were embossed with
designs, and I want to see if I can imitate the pattern so it blends into
the boards better.


I assume they used some sort of large brass die to make these impressions,
but how to do that today, I am not sure, though I have many single handed
brass tools at my disposal. Was it done with the cloth dry, damp, etc? I
know that whatever they used, it also went into the boards, as the design is
firmly pressed into the bookboards themselves beneath the cloth.


Thank you,

Beth Stegenga
Paternoster Row Books

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***********************************************
The Bonefolder, Vol. 4, No. 1, 2007 is Now Online at
<http://http://www.philobiblon.com/bonefolder>
For all your subscription questions, go to the
Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
See <http://www.philobiblon.com> for full information
***********************************************



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