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Re: [BKARTS] need help



In (re)reading Georges original post I see several potential issues. 80lb
text weight paper should not be causing problems, and I don't think
methylcellulose will help.

The first is grain direction. Make sure the grain of the paper is parallel
to the spine. That way it can expand. If the grain is perpendicular to the
spine, the paper is restrained along the spine edge while the fore-edge can
move. This will cause major wrinkles that really cannot be removed/prevented
unless one is super fast during casing in. 

In terms of gluing out materials I always apply the adhesive to the material
that will expand the fastest/most. Sometimes I may even mist the other piece
so that it too is relaxed.

Then there is the amount of glue. Simply put, the glue shouldn't be striking
through unless there is too much of it. I often use a 50/50 mixture of
PVA/Methylcellulose when casing it. It only strikes through if there was too
much of it and too much pressure. Make sure to brush out evenly without
puddles. 

I always case in using edged boards and a nipping press. I also place a
"fence" of folder stock or thin chipboard between the pastedown/boardsheet
and the textblock to help absorb moisture and prevent the turn-ins from
impressing themselves into the textblock.

In terms of thinner/funky decorative papers like some of the beautiful
Japanese ones, use paste to back them to a more substantial paper if you
want to use them for pastedowns/boardsheets Even if that strikes through it
won't show. Paste should be on the thinner side (I like heavy cream) and
brushed on with a soft brush.

Alternatively, you could use something like cold mount adhesive, stitch
wicker or the like, or make your own pseudo heat-set by brushing PVA evenly
and not heavily on the heavier paper, waiting until it's almost dry, laying
on the thin paper and carefully smoothing with your hands then iron down
making sure to have a clean sheet of paper between the iron and the
decorated.

Hope this helps,

p.
_____________________________________ 
Peter D. Verheyen
Bookbinder & Conservator, PA - AIC
<verheyen@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> 
The Book Arts Web & Book_Arts-L Listserv 
<http://www.philobiblon.com> 


-----Original Message-----
From: Book_Arts-L [mailto:BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of George
Baker
Sent: Wednesday, January 07, 2009 12:14 PM
To: BOOK_ARTS-L@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: [BKARTS] need help

Thanks Bill, These end sheets will be sewn in and are 80# text reinforced 
with cambric at the fold.

>
>
> On Jan 5, 2009, at 12:41 PM, George Baker wrote:
>
>> Because of a handicap and advanced age I learned bookbinding
>> sitting in a roller chair without ever being able to work with an
>> experienced binder or attend classes. I studied in  books and on
>> the net and found this forum very helpful. I have never used methyl
>> cellulose but read that it is sometimes used as sizing. In
>> construction end sheets with either PVA or wheat paste I have a
>> problem with adhesive bleeding through handmade decorative paper
>> and with wrinkling ; could this be solved by sizing with methyl
>> cellulose.  George Baker

                                    
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