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Re: [BKARTS] Onion Skin?



Heh -- didn't fare very well to the cut-out method of censoring!  I have
several that my grandfather kept that aren't all that happy -- the
lightweight paper with holes cut out of it, from his fellow
servicement, didn't do quite as well as sturdy scented pink-edged letters my
grandmother wrote him would have! ... the Vmail ones were much better, when
they instituted that.  Haven't seen any airmail-paper letters that were
subject to the black-marker method of censoring, though.

(My favorite censored letter: it ends with, "I can't tell you much about
what we're doing, but I can tell you that--" at which point it's cut out.
Looks like they needed to instruct servicemen a bit better in what was
classified and what wasn't!)

--Marguerite Radhakrishnan

On Thu, Apr 23, 2009 at 1:45 PM, Ingrid Wolsk <ingridwolsk@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:

> To Ann and others,
>
> Yes, I used onion skin paper when I wrote to service men overseas during WW
> II weight was a big factor then.
> Letters were censored then, I wonder how the paper fared to their methods
> of black outs. Never saw one that had been.
>
> Ingrid
>

                                    
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