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Re: [BKARTS] BOOK_ARTS-L Digest - 26 May 2009 to 27 May 2009 (#2009-147)



Foldable, Printable Vellum

I have had success with Strathmore InkJet Translucent Vellum. It prints nicely, and the only drawback is that it wrinkles if exposed to the moisture in paste. I believe some office supply stores carry it, and I know art supply houses do.
http://www.jerrysartarama.com/discount-art-supplies/Paper/Inkjet-Digital-Paper/Strathmore-Inkjet-Paper-and-Cards/Strathmore-Inkjet-and-Laser-Transluscent-Vellum.htm
Eugenie Torgerson

On May 26, 2009, at 7:46 AM, Dorothy Krause wrote:


Does anyone know of an inkjet or laser printable vellum paper that can be folded for signatures and sewn without cracking and tearing apart? Suggestions appreciated.
Dot


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------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 27 May 2009 09:49:45 -0500
From:    Tara O'Brien <inkfishpress@xxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: Outsourcing Mold Management - and other mold issues

Hello All - =A0Thank you for this very interesting discussion.=A0=A0Bob - to
answer your question first: We have 112 ft of a collection from a
cemetery that we will be sending out for cleaning. The archivist and I
assessed this collection separately and became incredibly sick with the
same symptoms, thus the outsourcing.=A0We are using American Freeze Dry
Operations in Deptford, New Jersey (we are in Philadelphia). Their
contact is: 856.939.8160 They will be using Sporicidin Brand Disinfectant
Towelettes and Oxine to clean this collection.=A0I have done some
preliminary research on both of these and found no giant warning signs.
Does anyone have any experience or thoughts on either of these?=A0 My
second question is: those of you working with special collections, what
is your policy about moldy collections?=A0 When is the line drawn on
keeping material or xeroxing and discarding? What are the=A0criteria for
making that decision?=A0We have a mold room and money for two mold "elves"
(in full tyvek suits, respirator, masks etc.), to clean (vacuum) specific
collections=A0on a=A0part time basis.=A0But one of them has now developed a
suspicious rash despite all precautions.=A0We wonder how effective this
type of cleaning is and what are the long term effects on the collections
and the people (archivists, conservators and researchers) who come in
contact with these items.=A0 Any and all thoughts would be much
appreciated. =A0Thanks, Tara



  Hi, All.
  I know someone with a very moldy book... Black spores throughout.
  Is there an outfit you'd recommend for treating this?
  Bob
  Eastern TN

--=20
Be Yourself @ mail.com!
Choose From 200+ Email Addresses
Get a Free Account at www.mail.com


=20 *********************************************** =20 NOW ONLINE, Volume 5, No. 2, Spring 2009 of The Bonefolder <http://www.philobiblon.com/bonefolder/vol5no2contents.htm> =20 Please note that attachments to listserv messages are not permitted, and are automatically removed by the listserver. =20 For all your subscription questions, go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive. See <http://www.philobiblon.com> for full information. =20 ***********************************************

------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 27 May 2009 07:57:46 -0700
From:    Rhonda Boothe <rhonda@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: Outsourcing Mold Management - and other mold issues

...=A0
...We have a mold room and money for two mold "elves"
(in full tyvek suits, respirator, masks etc.), to clean (vacuum) =
specific
collections=A0on a=A0part time basis.=A0But one of them has now =
developed a
suspicious rash despite all precautions.=A0
...

Tara (or others who might know):

Could they be allergic to the tyvek suit?

Rhonda
granny-artemis.com

                                   =20
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                                   =20
       NOW ONLINE, Volume 5, No. 2, Spring 2009 of The Bonefolder
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                                   =20
  Please note that attachments to listserv messages are not permitted,
            and are automatically removed by the listserver.
                                   =20
For all your subscription questions, go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
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                                   =20
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------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 27 May 2009 12:36:58 -0400
From:    Sarah Nicholls <snicholls@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: June workshops at the Center for Book Arts

Greetings from the Center for Book Arts:



There are still slots available in spring workshops at the Center for Book
Arts. Until May 31st, you can also take advantage of a limited-time discount
on workshops.  This is a great opportunity to jump in and learn new skills
at a special low rate, and if you become a member, you'll receive a double
discount. You can register online at
<http://www.centerforbookarts.org/classes> www.centerforbookarts.org/classes
or over the phone at 212-481-0295.

Below are some of the classes we have coming up in the next month:



>From Plants to Fiber to Thread
Many of the plants in your garden or those you see at the side of the road
or find in the supermarket can be made into different types of cordage for
use in bookbinding. Daylillies, hollyhocks, iris and elm are some of the
plants that can find their way into books once their blooming season is
over. Work with flax, jute, raffia and other exotic fibers (even pineapple)
to produce thread. Learn several methods of harvesting, processing and
twining natural fibers. We will bind a bark covered book with samples to
take home.


June 6-7, Saturday and Sunday, 10 am to 4pm

Instructor: Peter Schell

Spring Special: $245
Special for Members: $230
(Regular Price: $260)



Double Talk: Duality in the Artist's Book

In this workshop we will explore notions of duality: two languages, two
voices, reading in two directions, two narratives. We will begin with a trip
to the Special Collections of The New York Public Library to view book works
that address duality--through their format, chosen subject matter or both.
We will discuss the challenges of working with text in its original language
and its translation. We will divide our time between the print shop, where
we will work on the Vandercook proof press to create printed covers for our
books, and the binding studio, constructing a book format appropriate for
this notion of duality.

June 22-26, Monday through Friday, 10 am to 4pm

Instructor: Lynne Avadenka

Spring Special: $500

Special for Members: $475

(Regular Price: $525)



Cloth Reback

This course is aimed at students with some experience of bookbinding who
want to further develop their skills in conservation and restoration.
Students will learn how to restore a cloth bound book and conserve the
original binding materials. Demonstrations and hands-on work will include:
cleaning and relining spines, making headbands, dying cloth, corner and
inner joint repair, headcap repair. Bring 2-3 books to work on.-Some
bookbinding experience required.


June 20-21, Saturday and Sunday, 10 am to 4pm

Instructor: Sophia Kramer

Spring Special: $245

Special for Members: $230

(Regular Price: $260)



The Brown Bag Bindery: Essential Tools 101
Many book arts facilities are limited in storage space and budgets to
purchase additional equipment. Now students can begin to acquire equipment
as they advance in their knowledge and skills. Continue creating books at
home after taking a workshop or community class. Complete and personalize: a
piercing cradle, sewing frame and finishing press. All tools are knock-down,
hand finished with multiple layers of eco-friendly paints. A carrying tote
is included.

June 27, Saturday, 10 am to 4pm

Instructor: Sylvia Alotta

Spring Special: $285

Special for Members: $270

(Regular Price: $300)



Platen Press Workshop

Printing business cards and invitations is faster and more efficient on a
platen press. Set lead type by hand, learn to lock it up in a chase, and
letterpress print editions of your own design. This class will offer the
chance for students to use both our foot-operated treadle platen press and
our tabletop presses safely in this comprehensive two-day workshop.


June 20-21, Saturday and Sunday, 10 am to 4pm

Instructor: Barbara Henry

Spring Special: $245

Special for Members: $230

(Regular Price: $260)



Bookbinding for Artists

This intensive, beginning workshop is designed to enable artists to use the
book format in their work as a means of expanding, preserving, and
restructuring ideas. Students will make four to five books, including an
accordion book, a long-stitch book, and variations on the pamphlet binding,
as well as a simple box (or two). The properties of bookbinding materials
will be discussed in detail.


June 29-July 3, Monday - Friday, 10am - 4pm

Instructor: Barbara Mauriello

Spring Special: $500

Members Special $475

(Regular Price $525)



Linoleum Prints

Summer is linoleum season. We will explore the medium and its myriad uses,
from simple patterns to complex color compositions. Linoleum is a perfect
accompaniment to type, and a great way to add color to the page. It can be
used to tell a story, to illustrate or to decorate, and can be printed on
the Center's Vandercook Proof Presses or at home on a kitchen table. We will
look at historical examples and learn techniques for transferring images,
for registration, color mixing and layering and combining linoleum with
other media such as watercolor, gouache and acrylics.


June 29-July 3, Monday through Friday, 10 am to 4pm

Instructor: Barbara Henry

Spring Special: $500

Members Special $475

(Regular Price $525)



Sarah Nicholls
Program Manager
The Center for Book Arts
28 W. 27th Street 3rd floor
New York, NY 10001
212-481-0295
www.centerforbookarts.org


***********************************************
NOW ONLINE, Volume 5, No. 2, Spring 2009 of The Bonefolder
<http://www.philobiblon.com/bonefolder/vol5no2contents.htm>
Please note that attachments to listserv messages are not permitted,
and are automatically removed by the listserver.
For all your subscription questions, go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
See <http://www.philobiblon.com> for full information.
***********************************************


------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 27 May 2009 12:41:43 -0700
From:    Cathy DeForest <cathy@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: BKarts--mold issues

Hello all,
I have another mold question. I bought an Asian antique cabinet with 21 good size drawers which smells of mold. Before putting my book arts materials inside, does any one have suggestions on how I should deal with this situation?


Thanks,
Cathy DeForest

Cathy DeForest
cathy@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Gallery DeForest and Jubilation Press
1067 Emigrant Creek Rd.
Ashland, OR 97520
541-690-6976
www.gallerydeforest.com

Gallery DeForest: illuminating artistry



On May 27, 2009, at 7:49 AM, Tara O'Brien wrote:

Hello All - Thank you for this very interesting discussion. Bob - to
answer your question first: We have 112 ft of a collection from a
cemetery that we will be sending out for cleaning. The archivist and I
assessed this collection separately and became incredibly sick with the
same symptoms, thus the outsourcing. We are using American Freeze Dry
Operations in Deptford, New Jersey (we are in Philadelphia). Their
contact is: 856.939.8160 They will be using Sporicidin Brand Disinfectant
Towelettes and Oxine to clean this collection. I have done some
preliminary research on both of these and found no giant warning signs.
Does anyone have any experience or thoughts on either of these? My
second question is: those of you working with special collections, what
is your policy about moldy collections? When is the line drawn on
keeping material or xeroxing and discarding? What are the criteria for
making that decision? We have a mold room and money for two mold "elves"
(in full tyvek suits, respirator, masks etc.), to clean (vacuum) specific
collections on a part time basis. But one of them has now developed a
suspicious rash despite all precautions. We wonder how effective this
type of cleaning is and what are the long term effects on the collections
and the people (archivists, conservators and researchers) who come in
contact with these items. Any and all thoughts would be much
appreciated. Thanks, Tara




 Hi, All.
 I know someone with a very moldy book... Black spores throughout.
 Is there an outfit you'd recommend for treating this?
 Bob
 Eastern TN

--
Be Yourself @ mail.com!
Choose From 200+ Email Addresses
Get a Free Account at www.mail.com



***********************************************

      NOW ONLINE, Volume 5, No. 2, Spring 2009 of The Bonefolder
      <http://www.philobiblon.com/bonefolder/vol5no2contents.htm>

 Please note that attachments to listserv messages are not permitted,
           and are automatically removed by the listserver.

For all your subscription questions, go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
See <http://www.philobiblon.com> for full information.


***********************************************

Cathy DeForest cathy@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Gallery DeForest and Jubilation Press
1067 Emigrant Creek Rd.
Ashland, OR 97520
541-690-6976
www.gallerydeforest.com

Gallery DeForest: illuminating artistry






***********************************************
NOW ONLINE, Volume 5, No. 2, Spring 2009 of The Bonefolder
<http://www.philobiblon.com/bonefolder/vol5no2contents.htm>
Please note that attachments to listserv messages are not permitted,
and are automatically removed by the listserver.
For all your subscription questions, go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
See <http://www.philobiblon.com> for full information.
***********************************************


------------------------------

Date:    Wed, 27 May 2009 20:33:10 -0700
From:    Laura Russell <simplybooksltd@xxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Alice in Wonderland Artist Books

Hello Book Artists,
I am looking for artist books interpreting Alice in Wonderland for
consignment in the gallery. We have a painter who is illustrating Alice in
the main gallery in July and I'd love to fill our book case in the back room
with Alice artist books. If you have made Alice books please email me a
photo of the book or a link to a web page. A few details about the book and
a retail price would be appreciated.

Have a good day,

Laura



***********************************************
NOW ONLINE, Volume 5, No. 2, Spring 2009 of The Bonefolder
<http://www.philobiblon.com/bonefolder/vol5no2contents.htm>
Please note that attachments to listserv messages are not permitted,
and are automatically removed by the listserver.
For all your subscription questions, go to the Book_Arts-L FAQ and Archive.
See <http://www.philobiblon.com> for full information.
***********************************************



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